[lfs-support] Ethernet Card Not Found

Alan Feuerbacher alanf00 at comcast.net
Mon Nov 25 06:59:44 PST 2013


On 11/24/2013 2:33 PM, Pierre Labastie wrote:
> Le 24/11/2013 19:24, David Kredba a écrit :
>> Do you have pciutils installed?
>> If not install it (you can use liveCD or what you used to do first
>> installation and chroot inside your current system or download it and
>> copy in if you have USB storage working etc.).
>> Then start in single mode and post output of lspci -v.
>>
>> David
>>
>> 2013/11/24 Alan Feuerbacher <alanf00 at comcast.net>:
>>> On 11/24/2013 10:33 AM, Bruce Dubbs wrote:
>>>> Alan Feuerbacher wrote:
>>>>> On 11/24/2013 12:19 AM, Bruce Dubbs wrote:
>>>
>>> Per Ken's suggestion, I added the ethernet driver for my Realtek
>>> ethernet device, recompiled the kernel, reinstalled systemd/udev from
>>> scratch. Still no luck.
>>>
>>> When linux starts, I see a message:
>>> "Bringing up the eth0 interface... skipped"
>>>
>>> When I try to bring up the network with ifup I get this:
>>>
>>> ifup eth0
>>> #######
>>>       Bringing up the eth0 interface...
>>>       Adding IPv4 address 10.0.1.1 to the eth0 interface...Cannot find
>>> device "eth0"
>>> *****
>>>
>>> *****face eth0 doesn't exist.
>>> #######
>>>
>>>>> Ok, then I must have missed something when building the system. What do
>>>>> I look for in the LFS book to build the right ethernet driver?
>>>>
>>>> Bring up a working system and run lsmod.
>>>
>>> I get this:
>>>
>>> lsmod
>>> ######
>>> Module                  Size    Used by
>>> x86_pkg_temp_thermal    4511    0
>>> ######

> I think Bruce was talking about a working distribution (the one you used to
> build LFS for example). Boot it and run lsmod.
> The information you get there could indicate the right driver for the kernel.

Ah! Here's the output from the Fedora host with lsmod :

#######
Module                  Size  Used by
vfat                   17411  1
fat                    60886  1 vfat
fuse                   82599  3
bnep                   19704  2
bluetooth             361772  7 bnep
nf_conntrack_netbios_ns    12665  0
nf_conntrack_broadcast    12527  1 nf_conntrack_netbios_ns
ipt_MASQUERADE         12880  1
ip6t_REJECT            12939  2
xt_conntrack           12760  42
ebtable_nat            12807  0
ebtable_broute         12731  0
bridge                110624  1 ebtable_broute
stp                    12868  1 bridge
llc                    14045  2 stp,bridge
ebtable_filter         12827  0
ebtables               30758  3 ebtable_broute,ebtable_nat,ebtable_filter
ip6table_nat           13015  1
nf_conntrack_ipv6      18782  24
nf_defrag_ipv6         34589  1 nf_conntrack_ipv6
nf_nat_ipv6            13213  1 ip6table_nat
ip6table_mangle        12700  1
ip6table_security      12710  1
ip6table_raw           12683  1
ip6table_filter        12815  1
ip6_tables             26808  5 
ip6table_filter,ip6table_mangle,ip6table_security,ip6table_nat,ip6table_raw
iptable_nat            13011  1
nf_conntrack_ipv4      14808  20
nf_defrag_ipv4         12673  1 nf_conntrack_ipv4
nf_nat_ipv4            13199  1 iptable_nat
nf_nat                 25743  5 
ipt_MASQUERADE,nf_nat_ipv4,nf_nat_ipv6,ip6table_nat,iptable_nat
nf_conntrack           86430  11 
nf_conntrack_netbios_ns,ipt_MASQUERADE,nf_nat,nf_nat_ipv4,nf_nat_ipv6,xt_conntrack,ip6table_nat,nf_conntrack_broadcast,iptable_nat,nf_conntrack_ipv4,nf_conntrack_ipv6
iptable_mangle         12695  1
iptable_security       12705  1
iptable_raw            12678  1
b43                   387900  0
bcma                   40955  1 b43
snd_hda_codec_hdmi     41117  1
x86_pkg_temp_thermal    14162  0
coretemp               13435  0
kvm                   421021  0
crc32_pclmul           13113  0
ghash_clmulni_intel    13259  0
mac80211              564847  1 b43
cfg80211              460310  2 b43,mac80211
eeepc_wmi              13151  0
snd_hda_codec_realtek    55704  1
asus_wmi               24071  1 eeepc_wmi
sparse_keymap          13584  1 asus_wmi
rfkill                 21694  5 cfg80211,bluetooth,asus_wmi
iTCO_wdt               13480  0
mxm_wmi                12865  0
iTCO_vendor_support    13419  1 iTCO_wdt
snd_hda_intel          44075  4
snd_hda_codec         179171  3 
snd_hda_codec_realtek,snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_hda_intel
snd_hwdep              13554  1 snd_hda_codec
snd_seq                60752  0
snd_seq_device         14136  1 snd_seq
snd_pcm                98071  3 
snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_hda_codec,snd_hda_intel
ssb                    65906  1 b43
mmc_core              112289  2 b43,ssb
r8169                  71677  0
mii                    13527  1 r8169
wmi                    18697  2 mxm_wmi,asus_wmi
snd_page_alloc         18268  2 snd_pcm,snd_hda_intel
lpc_ich                21080  0
snd_timer              28698  2 snd_pcm,snd_seq
mfd_core               13182  1 lpc_ich
snd                    75313  17 
snd_hda_codec_realtek,snd_hwdep,snd_timer,snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_pcm,snd_seq,snd_hda_codec,snd_hda_intel,snd_seq_device
mei_me                 18421  0
mei                    76745  1 mei_me
shpchp                 37032  0
soundcore              14491  1 snd
mperf                  12607  0
i2c_i801               18136  0
serio_raw              13413  0
microcode              23527  0
uinput                 17625  0
i915                  656126  3
crc32c_intel           22079  0
i2c_algo_bit           13257  1 i915
drm_kms_helper         50239  1 i915
drm                   278576  4 i915,drm_kms_helper
i2c_core               34242  5 
drm,i915,i2c_i801,drm_kms_helper,i2c_algo_bit
video                  19104  2 i915,asus_wmi
#######

> Before that and if you are still on LFS:
> ip link list

#######
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode 
DEFAULT group default
     link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
2: p4p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast 
state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
     link/ether 30:85:a9:8f:31:09 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
#######

I understand that "p4p1" is Fedora's name for what would in LFS be "eth0".

> If you see only lo and sit0, it means you do not have the good device driver
> in the kernel. If you see something like enp0s2, it means something is wrong
> with the udev files, but at least you can try to bring that interface up.

It seems odd that the LFS "ip" command would find Fedora's "p4p1" 
device, but then, I don't really understand (yet) how this all works.

> Also, I see:
>   Adding IPv4 address 10.0.1.1 to the eth0 interface
>
> Are you sure you want 10.0.1.1? Usually, the .1 address is that of the
> ethernet hub which connects your local network to the outside world. I'd try
> 10.0.1.9 (unless you have many computers on your local network, that address
> should be free...)

Actually I found some information on the Fedora host system that 
indicates that this ought to be "10.0.1.31", but again I'm really sure 
of that. At any rate, I put "10.0.1.31" in the file "ifconfig.eth0" and 
tried to bring it up in LFS with "ifup eth0". The system gave me the 
same error message, that it could not find "eth0".

Below are the outputs of several other hopefully useful commands.


Using ifconfig on the Fedora host system:
########
lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING>  mtu 65536
         inet 127.0.0.1  netmask 255.0.0.0
         inet6 ::1  prefixlen 128  scopeid 0x10<host>
         loop  txqueuelen 0  (Local Loopback)
         RX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
         RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
         TX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
         TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

p4p1: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
         inet 10.0.1.31  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 10.0.1.255
         inet6 fe80::3285:a9ff:fe8f:3109  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
         ether 30:85:a9:8f:31:09  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
         RX packets 397  bytes 68874 (67.2 KiB)
         RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
         TX packets 163  bytes 17889 (17.4 KiB)
         TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0
########

Using ip addr on the LFS system from the LFS chroot environment:
#######
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN 
group default
     link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
     inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
        valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
     inet6 ::1/128 scope host
        valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: p4p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast 
state UP group default qlen 1000
     link/ether 30:85:a9:8f:31:09 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
     inet 10.0.1.31/24 brd 10.0.1.255 scope global p4p1
        valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
     inet6 fe80::3285:a9ff:fe8f:3109/64 scope link
        valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
#######

Using ip link list on the Fedora host:
#######
1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode 
DEFAULT group default
     link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
2: p4p1: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast 
state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
     link/ether 30:85:a9:8f:31:09 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
#######

Using route -n on the Fedora host:
#######
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use 
Iface
0.0.0.0         10.0.1.1        0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 p4p1
10.0.1.0        0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     1      0        0 p4p1
#######

BTW, I got the X Windows system running. The expected 3 xterm windows 
pop up, but the mouse does not work. The one window that has focus 
responds to linux commands. I'm certain that there's something wrong 
with how I set up the mouse stuff in the LFS book, but that's for 
another thread.

Alan



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