my lsmod versus LFS DVD lsmod

Ken Moffat zarniwhoop73 at googlemail.com
Mon Mar 22 15:13:17 PDT 2010


On 22 March 2010 19:56, brown wrap <gramos at yahoo.com> wrote:
> my kernel loads two modules:
>
> ohci_hcd               19241  0
> ehci_hcd               30605  0
>
> lsmod of LFS 6.3:
>
> Module                  Size  Used by
> usbhid                 32704  0
> ext3                  118664  2
> jbd                    69360  1 ext3
> psmouse                46620  0
> pcspkr                  4864  0
> ext2                   56584  1
> isofs                  39780  1
> zlib_inflate           17024  1 isofs
> sg                     37800  0
> sr_mod                 19492  1
> cdrom                  42152  1 sr_mod
> sd_mod                 29568  3
> ohci1394               39240  0
> ahci                   27140  3
> ohci_hcd               25220  0
> ehci_hcd               37004  0
> sata_sil24             18052  0
> libata                141456  2 ahci,sata_sil24
> ieee1394              109912  1 ohci1394
> usbcore               153776  4 usbhid,ohci_hcd,ehci_hcd
> amd74xx                17584  0 [permanent]
> ide_core              160784  1 amd74xx
>
> My problem is I don't know how to make the one-to-one correspondence in building a kernel. For example, I have no idea what ohci1394 is.
>
 If you look at the help in menuconfig, it usually tells you "the
modules will be called".  So
find -name Kconfig | xargs grep 'called ohci1394'
and then look at the Kconfig file that matches (that one is
for firewire, aka 1394 or ieee1394).

 Also note that although you probably have the hardware (i.e.
a chipset which has a 1394 port) you weren't using it when you
ran lsmod, so you might not need it.

 In general, the best advice is to review your hardware (e.g. use
lspci), and build in everything you know you need.  If desperate,
or if you have problems (such as your usb problems), one
possible approach (apart from the suggestions already made) is
to make everything that looks perhaps-related as a module.
Once you have a kernel, test it to see if you can do everything
you expect to do on the host system.

 Udev is now reasonably good at working out what to load for
the hardware that is present, but each individual version of the
kernel brings new bugs.

 In general, if people have a modifiable host system, and it
is recent enough to build the kernel you are going to use in
LFS, I recommend that people do that (_without_ an initrd or
initramfs) - and keep tweaking it until it works sufficiently
*before* they start LFS.

ĸen
-- 
After tragedy, and farce, "OMG poneys!"



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