Stuck at 5.7.1

linux fan linuxscratch at gmail.com
Sun Jan 10 09:42:18 PST 2010


On 1/9/10, Abhinav Chaturvedi wrote:

> So I guess I am looking for someone to tell me - perhaps reassure me - that
> I could build my own shareable (on a disk) distro that could compete
> (outperform?) standard linux distros. I understand I would need to do other
> stuff - like arrange for an installer. But if I could know now from people
> who know better that its possible, then it will would help me persist.

My reason for building LFS is to have a system that is built the way I
want it. There is a Live-CD and there is a jhalfs tool for automating
the build. They do not come close to solving all the difficulties of
creating a distro. However, they are a beginning, and they prove that
there are possibilities. I think it is a matter of interest and
persistence.

In this interview
http://www.crazyengineers.com/gerard-beekmans-building-linux-from-scratch/
Gerard Beekmans said:
"
Once you finished building an LFS system, it’s fully functional and
there’s nothing inferior about it. There are countless number of LFS
systems in mission critical production environments around the world.
I tried a number of distributions and could not decide on any one.
... it became apparent that there would not be a single system that
would be perfect for me. So I set out to create my own Linux system
that would fully conform to my personal preferences.
Read the book we wrote for our users. But, don’t be afraid to deviate
from it. After all, that’s the whole point of the project: to make a
system for yourself, not according to somebody else’s specifications.
"

And in this interview
http://it.toolbox.com/blogs/locutus/its-linux-and-i-did-it-my-way-an-interview-with-gerard-beekmans-19686
he said:
"
Teaching has always been the primary goal of LFS. That will never
change, lest LFS ceases to be what it is. But there also is no limit
to teaching. As we all learn more about Linux system creation and
package integration, that knowledge ought to be shared with the
community. The LFS books are good places to store that information in
a concise format.

But I think we also cannot ignore the automated process requirements anymore.
As a prime example, I (of course) use LFS at work. All our Linux
servers are LFS based but there are times, I unfortunately am forced
to (temporarily) use a different system. Always due to time
constraints and ALFS isn't quite ready for this kind of deployment
with the unique needs some workplaces have.
"



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