Headers problems

Tijnema tijnema at gmail.com
Sat Jun 9 16:24:42 PDT 2007


On 6/10/07, Wit <WitlessIdiot at triad.rr.com> wrote:
> Tijnema wrote:
> > On 6/9/07, Wit <WitlessIdiot at triad.rr.com> wrote:
> >> Tijnema wrote:
> >> > On 6/9/07, Wit <WitlessIdiot at triad.rr.com> wrote:
> >> >> Tijnema wrote:
> >> >> ><snip>
>
> >> >> I suggest doing your kernel with CONFIG_ACPI=y and
> >> CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL=y
> >> >> if you mobo support acpi. Then you can cat
> >> >> /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature
> >> >> in a loop to get a more accurate reading.
> >> > I've compiled kernel (2.6.17.11) with both options, and my motherboard
> >> > does support ACPI, (I can see in dmesg log too), but the folder
> >> > /proc/acpi/thermal_zone is empty for me.
> >>
> >> ?? Is /proc mounted? I *think* that unless something like acpi=off is on
> >> the kernel command line, that ought to be available when /proc is
> >> mounted. However, I am a "casual" user and maybe more is needed. There
> >> were quite a few parms in the .config file related to acpi and I
> >> selected only two obvious ones to mention.
>
> My LFS is shutdown ATM, but my CentOS 4.5 EL is 2.6.9 ATM and my CentOS
> 5.0 is 2.6.18-8. Anyway, I showed the ACPI kernel settings for those
> below. Since the mobo does support ACPI, is it enabled? I know it seems
> dumb to ask such basic questions, but my experience is that I tend to
> overlook the obvious too often.

When i look into the boot logs, it shows some ACPI things, so i guess
it's enabled...
/# dmesg | grep ACPI
acpiphp: ACPI Hot Plug PCI Controller Driver version: 0.5
ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKA] enabled at IRQ 10
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:01:00.0[A] -> Link [LNKA] -> GSI 10 (level,
low) -> IRQ 10
ACPI: Power Button (FF) [PWRF]
ACPI: Power Button (CM) [PWRB]
ACPI: Sleep Button (CM) [SLPB]
ACPI: CPU0 (power states: C1[C1] C2[C2])
ACPI: Processor [CPU0] (supports 2 throttling states)
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:0c.0[A] -> Link [LNKA] -> GSI 10 (level,
low) -> IRQ 10
ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKD] enabled at IRQ 11
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:07.2[D] -> Link [LNKD] -> GSI 11 (level,
low) -> IRQ 11
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:07.3[D] -> Link [LNKD] -> GSI 11 (level,
low) -> IRQ 11
ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKC] enabled at IRQ 5
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:07.5[C] -> Link [LNKC] -> GSI 5 (level,
low) -> IRQ 5
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:0a.0[A] -> Link [LNKC] -> GSI 5 (level,
low) -> IRQ 5
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:0a.1[A] -> Link [LNKC] -> GSI 5 (level,
low) -> IRQ 5
ACPI: PCI interrupt for device 0000:00:0a.1 disabled

>
> >
> > Yes, of course /proc is mounted :P
> >
> > The directory's /proc/acpi/thermal_zone exist, but that one is empty.
> > Please look at this:
> > cat config-2.6.17.11 | grep ACPI
> > # Power management options (ACPI, APM)
> > # ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) Support
> > CONFIG_ACPI=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_AC=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_BATTERY=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_BUTTON=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_VIDEO=y
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_HOTKEY is not set
> > CONFIG_ACPI_FAN=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_PROCESSOR=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL=y
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_ASUS is not set
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_IBM is not set
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_TOSHIBA is not set
> > CONFIG_ACPI_BLACKLIST_YEAR=0
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_DEBUG is not set
> > CONFIG_ACPI_EC=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_POWER=y
> > CONFIG_ACPI_SYSTEM=y
> > # CONFIG_ACPI_CONTAINER is not set
> > CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_ACPI=y
> > CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_ACPI_IBM=y
> > CONFIG_PNPACPI=y
> >
> > Seems that i've enabled enough ACPI options right?
>
> Yes. But maybe you need this too?
>
> CONFIG_X86_MCE_P4THERMAL=y

I have that one enabled too, any more suggestions?

>
> Just in case, I'll show my other acpi-related params from both my CentOS
> systems.
>
> My CentOS 4.5 has these.
>
> CONFIG_ACPI=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_BOOT=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_INTERPRETER=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP_PROC_FS=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_AC=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BATTERY=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BUTTON=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_FAN=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_PROCESSOR=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_ASUS=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_TOSHIBA=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BLACKLIST_YEAR=2001
> # CONFIG_ACPI_DEBUG is not set
> CONFIG_ACPI_BUS=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_EC=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_POWER=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_PCI=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SYSTEM=y
>
> This system has an SiS chipset, IIRC and seems to not need a special
> module, as I see none in the lsmod output.
>
> And my 5.0 has this
>
> CONFIG_ACPI=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP_PROC_FS=y
> # CONFIG_ACPI_SLEEP_PROC_SLEEP is not set
> CONFIG_ACPI_AC=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BATTERY=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BUTTON=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_VIDEO=m
> # CONFIG_ACPI_HOTKEY is not set
> CONFIG_ACPI_FAN=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_DOCK=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_PROCESSOR=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_HOTPLUG_CPU=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_ASUS=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_IBM=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_TOSHIBA=m
> CONFIG_ACPI_BLACKLIST_YEAR=1999
> # CONFIG_ACPI_DEBUG is not set
> CONFIG_ACPI_EC=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_POWER=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SYSTEM=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_CONTAINER=y
> CONFIG_ACPI_SBS=m
>
> Also,  the 5.0 has an inserted module, asus_acpi. I don't think every
> system needs a special driver though, whether module or compiled in. But
> you may need to check extended explanations in kernel config and see if
> you might need the IBM/ASUS/TOSHIBA driver enabled?

I have an Biostart M7VKD mobo, with 2 VIA chipsets on it, so I guess I
don't need anything built in/ module.
>
> >>
> >> >> <snip>
> >>
> >> >> Another test: remove everything you can and see if boot succeeds
> >> at full
> >> >> clocking. Then add items back in, one at time. The power requirements
> >> >> listed on various devices may let you calculate the maximum load with
> >> >> doing all this remove/re-insert.
> >> >
> >> > Are you sure you read the whole thread? I said that when I set my CPU
> >> > speed to the original speed, the whole PC wouldn't start, nor the fans
> >> > started spinning...
> >> > I tried to boot the PC with only CPU+Motherboard+RAM+PS, but even then
> >> > the fans didn't start to spin.
> >>
> >> Yes, I read the whole thread. Please forgive my faulty memory of all the
> >> details.
> >
> > Sure i will :P
> >>
> >> >> <snip>
> >>
> >> >
> >> > When downclocked, booting isn't a problem. It's just in a regular
> >>
> >> That's one of the things that reminds me that PS may be involved. Higher
> >> frequency = higher amperage needs. Of course, there could be other
> >> things, like timing issues, that would also be affected by the frequency
> >> selection.
> >
> > And why does it stop working after some time?
>
> Asking for theories here? Or just testing them? Regardless, the power
> supply is affected by heat. The capacitors are so affected. Everything
> on the board that is electrical will suffer some degradation as they
> heat up. Overheated CPU/memory/... are the most common victims of
> overheat, but a power supply or capacitor or circuit (with a "cold
> solder" joint) can begin to fail as things get warm.

Ok, just to make sure the CPU cooling was good enough, I placed 3 fans
on it, all 3 in right direction, so that it got ultra cooled :)
Still, it didn't pass the GCC testsuite, as it stopped after maybe
30-60 seconds.
>
> Experience indicates that when things fail at seemingly random times
> after running for a short (long) while, and does it consistently,
> something is affected by the heat. It may be not too hot, it may be a
> week circuit that develops an open/short when it gets warmed up.
>
> As power supply heats up, its efficiency drops. If it has a bad circuit,
> it may open/short.
>
> It all *seems* somewhat random to us because we cannot see the variables
> that are in play.
>
> That's wehn the aggregate experience of the list may become helpful.
> Sometimes others (in large numbers) have faced this sort of problem
> before and found "solutions". Some of the folks are even hardware
> "experts" with EE degrees, etc. I'm not, so I rely on others and my own
> experience over many decades.
>
> Regardless, it's all "a shot in the dark" when talking about a system
> you can't instrument.

Tomorrow I will try the system with a  Asus 350W PSU, which now runs
an AMD X2 4400+ with 2 HDDs and a GeForce 7600GT..., should be enough
for my old system :)

>
> >> <snip>
>
> >>
> >> >
> >> > I've built my own case, it's more like a wooden block :P No covers or
> >> > such, but I can get front and back off it, both are bigger than a
> >> > regular cover :P
> >>
> >> What are you using for chassis ground? I'm no elec whiz, but I seem to
> >> recall stuff in the past that talks about Vcc floating around and having
> >> nasty effects if good ground is not available. Seems like a weak
> >> possibility though.
> >
> > There are just a few pins screwed into the wood, and well, that's it...
> > I don't have ground at the place my server is, so It doesn't matter if
> > I connect it to the ground of the PSU...
>
> Does your plug have 3 prongs? If so, a "ground" is provided via  the
> household wiring.

Nope, and a dutch plug does never. We have different plugs than else
around the world, but I've already opened the power-point a few times,
and there are only 2 wires inside....
>
> But it is important that the mobo and PS see the same Vcc (IIRC) so that
> there is no ground potential difference. Run a wire from one of the mobo
> mounting pads that has metal under it to a convenient screw on the PS
> case. That should assure both are at same ground potential, avoid static
> charge buildup on the mobo (another possible cause of "random" lockup)
> and is a good thing even if not related to your problem. Be sure the
> wire is insulated except at the very ends. Don't let it touch anything
> hot or be placed such that is could suffer abrasion damage.

Hmm, when I'm replacing the PSU tomorrow, i'll see if i can add
another wire in the case :)
>
> A wire from the PS external screw to any metal cold water pipe, metal
> radiator, ... should provide a good ground and bleed off any static
> buildup. A wooden case may tend to encourage static buildup. I'm not sure.

That's the problem, the room where my pc (=server) is located is in a
room, where there is only some wood and a stone wall...
If I really need it, I would need to place a cable of about 10-15
meters to get to some metal, but then I could better connect it to a
real ground i think :)
>
> > <snip>
>
> >
> > Tijnema
> >
>
> Well, I'm out of thoughts. Again, good luck with it.
>
> --
> Wit.
>

You've already brought up a lot of points that could cause the problem :)
I'll try them all one by one... :)
Really thanks!

Tijnema



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