LFS Version 6.2 - Chapter 7. Setting Up System Bootscripts - The Bash Shell Startup Files

Dan Nicholson dbn.lists at gmail.com
Fri Aug 18 12:06:49 PDT 2006


On 8/18/06, Mag. Leonhard Landrock <1977-Hamlet at gmx.at> wrote:
>
> Next, I have a look at de_AT and its friends.
>
> root:/# LC_ALLL=de_AT locale charmap
> ANSI_X3.4-1968

First, it's LC_ALL with two L's. On my system I get:

$ LC_ALL=de_AT locale charmap
ISO-8859-1

That seems much more sensible as charset. Since you aren't passing
LC_ALL correctly, it's returning the default charset, maybe? I've
never seen that one used before, and it seems like a legacy name.

> root:/# LC_ALLL=ANSI_X3.4-1968 locale language

This isn't a valid locale specifier. You're only passing a character
set (besides the LC_ALLL issue). From the output of `locale -a', you
had

de_AT
de_AT.iso88591
de_AT.iso885915 at euro
de_AT at euro

So, you'd want to do something like this.

$ LC_ALL=de_AT locale charmap
ISO-8859-1

That means that the canonical locale name is de_AT.ISO-8859-1. Let's
see what it spits out for the other values.

$ LC_ALL=de_AT.ISO-8859-1 locale language
German
$ LC_ALL=de_AT.ISO-8859-1 locale charmap
ISO-8859-1
$ LC_ALL=de_AT.ISO-8859-1 locale int_curr_symbol
EUR
$ LC_ALL=de_AT.ISO-8859-1 locale int_prefix
43

Do those seem right? Also, the above would work if you left off the
charmap (.ISO-8859-1) since Glibc knows how to associate with it. The
canonical locale name becomes important later (most importantly for
X).

--
Dan



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