entering the chroot environment ,ch6

Jappie jappie at tiscalimail.nl
Thu Nov 13 04:25:59 PST 2003


Tom Scott wrote:

> On Tue Nov 11 14:09:46 MST 2003 Erik Postma wrote:
>
>> On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 00:53:46 -0200, michael <michael8110 at 
>> terra.com.br>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> thank you for your answers to my previous question about the sanity
>>> check in sec 'locking in glibc',after i did su - lfs it worked/
>>>  now i have another problem,the chroot $LFS  (with $LFS=/mnt/lfs)
>>>  returns /bin/bash : no such file or directory,which is quite 
>>> reasonable because
>>> the command should have been chroot /mnt/lfs/tools since that's 
>>> where  a
>>> /bin/bash is to be seen ,but then i get /bin/bash permission denied 
>>> (i'm as root) .Boy,is this tough!
>>
>>
>> The book says:
>>
>> chroot $LFS /tools/bin/env -i \
>>     HOME=/root TERM=$TERM PS1='\u:\w\$ ' \
>>     PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/usr/sbin:/tools/bin \
>>     /tools/bin/bash --login
>>
>> so in the /mnt/lfs chroot it refers to /tools/bin/bash. That is the file
>> which you'd refer to from outside chroot as /mnt/lfs/tools/bin/bash. The
>> permission denied message seems to indicate a more serious issue. Is 
>> your
>> LFS-partition mounted noexec?
>
>
> I have a related question. In section 6.3, "Entering the chroot 
> environment",
> the book says to "Become root and run the foloowing command". If I use 
> the
> su command without the - (login) option the LFS variable is still set and
> the command "chroot $LFS /tool/bin/env -i" works. If I use the su 
> command with
> the login option the LFS var is no longer set and the chroot command 
> fails.
> Is it safe to assume then that "become root" means "become root 
> without the
> login option"?
>
> -- TT
>
Yes, it is :)




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