Stupid 'tar' question

Magellanic magellanic at optushome.com.au
Tue Jan 21 06:50:21 PST 2003


It could be that you haven't chrooted to the LFS dir, so when you do tar
-xvf file.tar it sets the permission that you are using, redhat uses id
501 mainly for normal users I guess.. just wondering thats all.

Good luck

On Wed, 2003-01-22 at 02:01, Marc S. Jensen wrote:
> Hi all,
> 
> OK, this is probably a really silly question, and I feel like an idiot for asking, but this has been bugging me...
> 
> I've built LFS several times, and never had any important problems (except one time when I tried to manually do the i18n stuff in glibc and didn't know what I was doing), but...  Why in the name of <insert deity of choice> is it that, when I untar a source archive, the created files aren't owned by me?  I mean...
> 
> 1 - Login as root
> 
> 2 - Download xyz.tar.gz into /usr/src
> 
> 3 - gunzip xyz.tar 
> 
> I now have xyz.tar, owned by root.  No problem.
> 
> 4 - tar -xvf xyz.tar 
> 
> I now have all the xyz source files in /usr/src/xyz, but they'll all be owned by, say "501" or something.  And I don't even *have* a user with uid 501.  
> 
> What gives?  
> 
> I'll sometimes see similar things with ftp -- I.e., I ftp a file to my linux machine, logging in as a specific user, and the file ends up being owned by a non-existant uid.
> 
> None of this actually stops anything from working -- but I don't like having files on my system that aren't owned by actual users.  
> 
> Thanks for any suggestions!
> 
> -Marc-
> 
> 



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