[blfs-support] Systemd's journal (was Re: Latest news in GNOME world)

Bruce Dubbs bruce.dubbs at gmail.com
Mon Nov 12 18:26:45 PST 2012


Matt Burgess wrote:
> On Mon, 2012-11-12 at 15:26 -0600, Bruce Dubbs wrote:
>> Matt Burgess wrote:
>>> On Mon, 2012-11-12 at 11:56 -0600, Bruce Dubbs wrote:
>>>
>>>> What advantages does systemd give?
>>>>
>>>> Binary logs?  That's a little difficult to work with if Xorg isn't
>>>> working.  How do you grep a binary log?
>>>
>>> I was going to say 'me too' to all of your post, Bruce, but then, in
>>> trying to find the list of 18(!) guides on how to use the various
>>> components of systemd came across
>>> http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/journalctl.html which describes how to
>>> access the binary logs.  The features it provides all seem pretty neat
>>> and all accessible from the command line.  So, that's one less thing for
>>> me to hold against it.
>>
>>
>> OK, let's discuss this.  My first comment is that when you have custom
>> programs like this, the author has to think about everything an admin
>> might ever want.  What if the admin wants something the author didn't
>> think about?
>
> It's open source, they can just extend it :-)

That's true, but it's a lot easier to extend a bash script than a 
compiled program.

>> Third, if the logs were ascii, the bells and whistles in the link above
>> could be accomplished with a bash script fairly easily.
>
> Maybe my bash-fu is a bit rusty, but collating multiple sources of logs
> together, then filtering them back out again to drill down with the
> flexibility that journalctl provides would have me googling for a piece
> of software to do it after about an hour, I think :-)

cat file1 file2 | sort | grep ...

> Note that for home-user systems, I wouldn't bother with journalctl at
> all, but on the enterprise environment's I have to support, I'd want
> something like this to make cross-service log analysis much easier.

I do agree that it sometimes is useful, but my point earlier is that 
large distros set it as the default on all systems when only a few 
really need it.  The user is not even given a choice.  You have to do 
major surgery to remove it.

   -- Bruce



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