[blfs-support] Questions on (b)lfs-bootscripts-20120127

alupu at verizon.net alupu at verizon.net
Mon Feb 13 09:20:58 PST 2012


On 02/13/12, Nathan Coulson<conathan at gmail.com> wrote:


> The reason it was disabled, was that we believed that one clock source
> did a better job of keeping accurate time, then switching between 2
> (system, and the hardware clock).
> We actually use this code in BLFS, under
> http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/view/svn/basicnet/ntp.html as we
> consider ntpd an accurate source.


Hi Nathan,


You must have missed Andrew Benton's clear (and definitive, I'd say)
resolution to this conundrum (Sun Feb 5 04:29:11 MST 2012):
For easy reference, Andy's words:
<<
I seem to remember that the shutdown symlinks weren't made and the
setclock script wasn't run at shutdown unless you installed the ntp
daemon from BLFS.
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/view/svn/basicnet/ntp.html
Execute the following command if you would like to set the hardware clock
to the current system time at shutdown and reboot:
ln -v -sf ../init.d/setclock /etc/rc.d/rc0.d/K46setclock &&
ln -v -sf ../init.d/setclock /etc/rc.d/rc6.d/K46setclock
>>

In other words, if one uses something _like_ 'ntpd -q' as I do
(as does Andy too, I presume) in the course of their activities,
then resetting the hardware clock to the current _exact_ time
by running 'setclock stop' makes eminent sense.

So it was not really disabled, it's usage ("stop") was left to
the discretion of each individual, instead of forcing it on
the  unsuspecting (and Innocent) user.

In other words, FWIW, I 100% agree with Andy's treatment of this issue.

-- Alex






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