Building LFS/BLFS on USB.

Tijnema ! tijnema at gmail.com
Sun Apr 8 07:58:20 PDT 2007


On 4/8/07, Tijnema ! <tijnema at gmail.com> wrote:
> On 4/7/07, Michael Shell <list1 at michaelshell.org> wrote:
> > On Fri, 6 Apr 2007 10:09:25 +0200
> > "Tijnema !" <tijnema at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> > > ps. I don't know if it is a big problem, but i have no device nodes in
> > > /dev, except /dev/console. I tried to copy them from my system, but i
> > > can't because they act like very big files..., and so i get a error
> > > msg that there's no space left on the device. So, do i need to force
> > > udev or something to create devices in /mnt/initrd/dev?
> >
> >
> > Use:
> >
> > cp -a
> >
> > -a is the same as -dpPR and the -R option treats special files
> > as special files.
> >
> > FWIW, cp -a can use used to backup a running system (well, as long as
> > things aren't running that are making changes to the filesystem). A big
> > problem is that cp -a / /mnt/backupdisk will descend into /mnt. The -x
> > option may help here, but a lot of cp's out there have a broken -x
> > implementation. Also, it's still a problem if you have mounted
> > filesystems you want to back up. Putting it all in a script seems to be
> > the way to go.
> >
> > I always thought that it would be handy to have a wildcard that meant
> > "all except for this match". Some syntax like:
> >
> > cp -a /*!mnt /mnt/backup
> >
> > which would copy everything except /mnt
> >
> >
> >  Mike Shell
>
> Well, cp -a didn't work for me. It says that there's no space left on
> the device, while there's just a few % is used on my virtual file
> system. I have a file of 300K, i made an ext2 fs on it, and then i
> mounted it with -o loop, and then the cp does only copy a few files
> and then tells me the disk is full. and when i do a df it says i still
> have 270K left. weird huh?
>
> But i think that's not related to the problem, i will try to use udev
> or something like that later.
>
> I tried 3 configurations, this is my syslinux.cfg file:
>
> DEFAULT linux26
> APPEND initrd=initrd.gz rootdelay=10 init=/etc/start
> TIMEOUT 300
>
> PROMPT 1
> DISPLAY 1.msg
> F1 1.msg
> LABEL devrd
> KERNEL linux26
> APPEND initrd=initrd.gz rootdelay=10 root=/dev/rd/0 init=/etc/start
> LABEL devram
> KERNEL linux26
> APPEND initrd=initrd.gz rootdelay=10 root=/dev/ram0 init=/etc/start
> LABEL nodev
> KERNEL linux26
> APPEND initrd=initrd.gz rootdelay=10 init=/etc/start
>
> And this are the result on the screen for each configuration:
>
> devrd:
>
> RAMDISK: Compressed image found at block 0
> No filesystem could mount root, tried:
> Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs at unknown-block(0,0)
>
> devram:
>
> RAMDISK: Compressed image found at block 0
> No filesystem could mount root, tried:
> Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs at unknown-block(1,0)
>
> nodev:
>
> RAMDISK: Compressed image found at block 0
> No filesystem could mount root, tried:
> Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs at unknown-block(8,1)
>
> I thought this is probably useful information :)
>
> Any idea what i need to do to fix this?
>
> Thank you,
>
> Tijnema
>

Ok, it seems that i had misconfigured my kernel, first of all i had
ext2 compiled as module, that was just a stupid fault of me. Second i
didn't had cramfs support compiled into the kernel, and so it couldn't
read my compressed image.

I want to thank everyone for their time helping me finding a solution :)

Tijnema



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