prelude begins to suck !

Erika Pacholleck pchllck at nexgo.de
Mon Jul 14 23:29:08 PDT 2003


[14.07.2003] Laurent H. <-- :
> Jeroen Coumans a écrit :
> > I think it would be best if you'd try a new LFS system, with LFS CVS
> > and the pure-lfs.txt hint.
> 
> Isn't there a quickier solution (I've spent a lot of time buiding my
> LFS, and I'm not sure my familly would agree if I bounce in again !)

You never said what this prelude is (and I'm not fond to research that).
Normally once a program is compiled and installed it does not change its
linked-in libraries. The only thing I can imagine is, that prelude is
some hacker or security tool which somehow puts itself in front of
everything and pretends other programs cannot be without it.

If you are lucky you have
- built archives from all your lfs buildings
- archives of the installed lfs buildings
- ls -il install lists from all your lfs buildings
- md5sum lists of your directories
- a multipartition system with only var, tmps and homes mounted rw
Any of these could help you to check whether prelude was changing your
binaries or libraries, or whether they have not been touched. Another
one might be comparing the dates for example in /bin with those of your
prelude; if the dates are "near prelude install dates", it might be that
all those files were silently hacked - might be. Then you could use
something like `strings /bin/program | grep '<prelude lib name>'`. If a
binary itself contains the prelude link, there is no use of changing all
the stuff back.

Due to "impossible is lack of creativity" here an idea. But note, it is
just an idea and I don't know whether this can or will work at all.
Mount a free partition for example at /mnt/nopreludetest, create a basic
tree on it. Copy your etcs, bins, libs, shares of a basic LFS system
over to their /mnt/nopreludetest places, but one by one and not just the
whole directory (info, man, headers and such jokes are not needed for
testing). Make sure /mnt/nopreludetest/etc/ld.so.conf is empty.
Do a simple `chroot /mnt/nopreludetest` and immediately after that an
`ldconfig`.
If ldconfig complains about a missing prelude library, two ideas:
Try again with an empty /mnt/nopreludetest/etc/ld.so.cache.
Copy your systems /etc/ld.so.cache to another place, open that copy in
a hex editor and null out all library names which are not present on
your nopreludetest, then copy this one over and try again. (If you
backup your systems ld.so.conf and ld.so.cache, then go to single mode
empty ld.so.conf and do an ldconfig, your cache file will be smaller
and there's not so much to change; then copy this new cache file for
later editing, restore your old ld.so files and do an ldconfig, just
for safety.)

As a test you could use a simple ls command. And if you are very lucky
it even works and you can make it bootable and from there correct your
old system. But as said, these are just ideas and if you want a really
reliable system there is no way around building a whole new one from
scratch from a system which is prelude-free (pure-lfs or not).

-- 
Erika ...---...: pacholleck at nexgo dot de
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