BLFS use of /opt

dagmar at speakeasy.net dagmar at speakeasy.net
Mon Oct 7 10:20:59 PDT 2002


On Mon, 7 Oct 2002, Richard Lightman wrote:

> * dagmar at speakeasy.net <dagmar at speakeasy.net> [2002-10-07 07:34]:
> > On Sun, 6 Oct 2002, Richard Lightman wrote:
> >
> > > * Tushar Teredesai <tush at yahoo.com> [2002-10-06 16:04]:
> > > >
> > > > The problem with putting packages in /opt is that many things may need
> > > > to be changed - path, library path, manpath, infopath, path for pkgconfig.
> > > >
> > > There is supposed to be /opt/bin, which is full of links to things in
> > > /opt/kde/bin, /opt/gnome/bin, ...
> > >
> > > The same sort of thing should happen for /opt/lib, /opt/man,
> > > opt/info, ...
> > >
> > > This way you should only have to add opt once for each thing like path,
> > > instead of adding one entry for each package in path.
> >
> > This sound even more hideous than the problem of having a long PATH
> > declaration.  A directory full of symlinks?  Why not just symlink all of
> > /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin in there while you're at it and do away with
> > PATH statements for lusers entirely?
> >
> /usr/bin is just one directory, so it is not that much effort to add it
> to the path. Adding /usr/local/pspell/bin, /usr/local/postgresql/bin,
> /usr/local/openjade/bin and all the others would just be silly.
>
> /usr/local is supposed to work the same way as I described as /opt.
>
> It does not take much effort to create the symlinks:
>
> cd /opt/bin; cp -s ../package/bin/* .
>
>
> If you delete package, you can remove the broken links with:
>
> cd /opt/bin; for i in *; do [ -a "$i" ] || rm "$i"; done
>
>
> I use this method for deciding if something belongs in /opt:
> If it is less hassle to put a package in /opt/package than in /usr
> then it goes in /opt/package.

Then by your standard, Mark Hymers would be off his rocker, and I agree
with you.  Mozilla doesn't go into /opt by default.  Gnome doesn't go into
/opt by default.  Only Qt and KDE even attempt to put themselves there.

There's very little that will go into /opt/package more easily than it
will /usr.  Let us continue to use /opt only for packages that don't "play
nice" with the rest of the system. (i.e., keep all their own toolsets,
don't link to much of anything outside their directory excepting for
glibc, etc).

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