r4763 - trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config

randy at linuxfromscratch.org randy at linuxfromscratch.org
Fri Jul 22 15:59:58 PDT 2005


Author: randy
Date: 2005-07-22 16:59:56 -0600 (Fri, 22 Jul 2005)
New Revision: 4763

Modified:
   trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/compressdoc.xml
   trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/etcshells.xml
   trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/random.xml
Log:
Minor textual changes to the '/etc/shells', 'compressdoc' and 'Random Number Generation' sections of Chapter 3

Modified: trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/compressdoc.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/compressdoc.xml	2005-07-22 20:07:57 UTC (rev 4762)
+++ trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/compressdoc.xml	2005-07-22 22:59:56 UTC (rev 4763)
@@ -19,8 +19,9 @@
     <primary sortas="b-compressdoc">compressdoc</primary>
   </indexterm>
 
-  <para>Man and info reader programs can transparently process gzip'ed or
-  bzip2'ed pages, a feature you can use to free some disk space while keeping
+  <para>Man and info reader programs can transparently process files compressed
+  with <command>gzip</command> or <command>bzip2</command>, a feature you can
+  use to free some disk space while keeping
   your documentation available. However, things are not that simple; man
   directories tend to contain links—hard and symbolic—which defeat
   simple ideas like recursively calling <command>gzip</command> on them. A
@@ -496,25 +497,25 @@
 EOF
 chmod 755 /usr/sbin/compressdoc</userinput></screen>
 
-  <para>Now, as <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem>, you can issue a
-  <command>compressdoc --bz2</command> to compress all your system man
+  <para>Now, as <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem>, you can issue
+  the command <command>compressdoc --bz2</command> to compress all your system man
   pages. You can also run <command>compressdoc --help</command> to get
   comprehensive help about what the script is able to do.</para>
 
   <para> Don't forget that a few programs, like the <application>X Window
-  System</application>  and <application>XEmacs</application> also
-  install their documentation in non standard places (such as
-  <filename class="directory">/usr/X11R6/man</filename>, etc...). Be sure
-  to add these locations to the file <filename>/etc/man.conf</filename>, as a
-  <envar>MANPATH</envar>=<replaceable>[/path]</replaceable> section.</para>
+  System</application> and <application>XEmacs</application> also
+  install their documentation in non-standard places (such as
+  <filename class="directory">/usr/X11R6/man</filename>, etc.). Be sure
+  to add these locations to the file <filename>/etc/man.conf</filename>, as
+  <envar>MANPATH</envar> <replaceable>[/path]</replaceable> lines.</para>
 
   <para> Example:</para>
 
 <screen><literal>    ...
-    MANPATH=/usr/share/man
-    MANPATH=/usr/local/man
-    MANPATH=/usr/X11R6/man
-    MANPATH=/opt/qt/doc/man
+    MANPATH /usr/share/man
+    MANPATH /usr/local/man
+    MANPATH /usr/X11R6/man
+    MANPATH /opt/qt/doc/man
     ...</literal></screen>
 
   <para>Generally, package installation systems do not compress man/info pages,
@@ -522,7 +523,6 @@
   of your documentation as small as possible. Also, note that running the script
   after upgrading a package is safe; when you have several versions of a page
   (for example, one compressed and one uncompressed), the most recent one is kept
-  and the others deleted.</para>
+  and the others are deleted.</para>
 
 </sect1>
-

Modified: trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/etcshells.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/etcshells.xml	2005-07-22 20:07:57 UTC (rev 4762)
+++ trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/etcshells.xml	2005-07-22 22:59:56 UTC (rev 4763)
@@ -22,7 +22,8 @@
   <para>The <filename>shells</filename> file contains a list of
   login shells on the system. Applications use this file to determine
   whether a shell is valid. For each shell a single line should be
-  present, consisting of the shell's path, relative to root.</para>
+  present, consisting of the shell's path, relative to the root of the
+  directory structure (/).</para>
 
   <para>For example, this file is consulted by <command>chsh</command>
   to determine whether an unprivileged user may change the login shell for her
@@ -31,7 +32,7 @@
 
   <para>It is a requirement for applications such as
   <application>GDM</application> which does not populate the
-  face browser if it can't find <filename>/etc/shells</filename> or
+  face browser if it can't find <filename>/etc/shells</filename>, or
   FTP daemons which traditionally disallow access to users
   with shells not included in this file.</para>
 

Modified: trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/random.xml
===================================================================
--- trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/random.xml	2005-07-22 20:07:57 UTC (rev 4762)
+++ trunk/BOOK/postlfs/config/random.xml	2005-07-22 22:59:56 UTC (rev 4763)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
   will benefit from these instructions.</para>
 
   <para>When a Linux system starts up without much operator interaction, the
-  entropy pool, data used to compute a random number, may be in a fairly
+  entropy pool (data used to compute a random number) may be in a fairly
   predictable state.  This creates the real possibility that the number generated
   at startup may always be the same.  In order to counteract this effect,
   you should carry the entropy pool information across your shut-downs and
@@ -38,4 +38,3 @@
 <screen role="root"><userinput>make install-random</userinput></screen>
 
 </sect1>
-




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